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Is Your Gut Feeling Making You A Conspiracy Theorist?

gut feelings, conspiracy theory,

People who rely on their gut feelings to determine what is true and false are more likely to believe conspiracy theories, according to a new study by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden.

The study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, found that people who believe that truth is relative are more likely to be susceptible to misleading information. This is because they are less likely to question information that confirms their existing beliefs, even if it is false.

Truth relativism can be a slippery slope.

Julia Aspernäs, a PhD student at Linköping University, Sweden, has found that people who believe that truth is relative are more likely to fall victim to incorrect or fraudulent information.

Aspernäs and her colleagues conducted two studies, which were published in the journal Journal of Research in Personality. In the first study, they asked participants to answer questions about their views on truth. The second study involved participants reading fake news articles and then rating how believable they found the articles.

The researchers found that people who scored higher on a measure of truth relativism were more likely to believe the fake news articles. They also found that truth relativism was associated with a greater willingness to share fake news on social media.

Aspernäs said that she believes that truth relativism is a dangerous belief because it can lead people to believe anything they want to believe, regardless of whether it is true or not. She said that it is important for people to be critical of the information they consume and to be aware of the dangers of fake news.

Two types of truth relativism

A study by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden has found that there are two main types of truth relativism: subjective truth relativism and cultural truth relativism.

Truth is in the eye of the beholder

Subjective truth relativism is the belief that truth is relative to the individual. This means that what is true for one person may not be true for another. People who believe in subjective truth relativism may say things like “My truth is different from your truth” or “There is no such thing as objective truth.”

What’s true for you may not be true for me.

Cultural truth relativism is the belief that truth is relative to the culture or group of people. This means that what is true in one culture may not be true in another. People who believe in cultural truth relativism may say things like “What is true in America is not true in China” or “There is no such thing as universal truth.”

The researchers found that people who believe in subjective truth relativism are more likely to believe in conspiracy theories and nonsense sentences. They are also more likely to be dogmatic and less willing to change their minds when presented with new facts.

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